What Kind of Pole Should I Buy? A Primer on Spinning vs Static Dance Poles

Hi, 

I’ve been pole dancing for 3 months, and I feel comfortable enough to invest in a pole. What are some good pole brands to purchase from, and should I buy a spinning pole or a stationary one? I’ve read that some people consider spinning poles as cheating. What do you think? 

Congratulations! Pole dance is so much fun, isn’t it?

There are plenty of good brands to purchase poles from. We recommend professional brands like Lil Minx and X-Pole, which are designed for pole dancing. We don’t recommend brands you can by inexpensively at places like Spencer’s because those poles are actually prop poles. They’re not made to withstand the wear, pressure, and usage pole dancing may put on them.

In terms of purchasing a pole, there are generally three types of poles: static, spinning, and dual. Most dancers start off by using the static pole, and graduate to experiment with the spinning pole. At the end of the day, both poles have their pros and cons, so choosing a pole truly comes down to figuring out what kind of pole best suits you.

Pole dancer

Static Poles

As we’ve stated, many dancers learn on static poles, which are stationary and do not move. Static poles are beneficial for building a strong grip and hand muscles. As you’re pretty new to pole, you may find static poles provide stability to perfect your moves. Static poles drag on the skin, which causes callouses as you learn – but don’t worry. Most of us bear our callouses with pride; they’re the markings of true pole warriors.

Spinning Poles

Spinning poles require a different kind of strength than static poles. Spinning poles rotate as you move, allowing you to gain momentum in your spins and twirls faster. Spinning poles tend to gain momentum and do some of the work for you, because their design allows you to maintain a strong grip (and sense of motion) while they twirl for you. Spinning poles provide beautiful inverted movements without dragging your skin against the pole. However, this kind of pole can cause dizziness and motion sickness, so it’s always best to test out spinning pole moves at your local studio.

Which Pole is Best for You?

We prefer you start out with whichever pole you’re most interested in. Generally speaking, most dancers start on a stationary pole, but it’s not unheard of for many to train exclusively with a spinning one. You can purchase professional poles that can be used for static and spinning purposes. At the end of the day, you can always come down to our studio and take classes using both poles, so you can get a feel for the pole that fits you – and the moves you want to do – best.

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